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Vapers experience DNA changes, according to a recent paper published in Nature, and the changes are similar to those seen in smokers – although much less pronounced.

Crucially, this evidence was based on a few people by examining changes in their DNA at the time of the analysis, similar to creating a snapshot image, without considering any potential future change in vaping or smoking behaviour. The study does not provide real-world evidence of vaping-associated ill health in humans. Positively, the study attempts to separate the effects of vaping itself from the effects of damage caused by tobacco smoking. [...]

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China revealed on November 26 that it would officially regulate vaping products under its tobacco monopoly law.

The decision has massive implications for tobacco harm reduction worldwide: China is both the largest tobacco market and the largest e-cigarette producer on Earth. The country previously imposed restrictions on vapes, and some observers feared a crackdown on the industry. Now, vaping has a legal status in China that should secure its future.

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Nicotine pouches to be put under the upper lip are a new category of products that are being rapidly developed and marketed as consumer goods with little research or regulatory oversight. We have identified research gaps in assessing their harm and benefit potential, and possible regulatory science approaches to inform the policies that can allow a maximization of the category’s public health potential while minimizing unintended consequences.

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The CCC cited a 2021 Action on Smoking and Health (ASH) report, which examined vaping behaviours among youths in the UK, and found that an overwhelming majority (83%) of teens and pre-teens aged between 11 and 18, have never tried or even heard of e-cigarettes. This finding has remained consistent since 2017. Moreover, said the ASH report, vaping was much less common among youths who had never smoked, with a large majority of the same age group being “never smokers”, at 94.1% and 87.9% having never vaped. Moreover, 6.2% were not even aware of vaping products.

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On the face of it, it seems odd that a case has to be made for the promotion of safer nicotine products (SNPs) as part of a global tobacco harm reduction (THR) strategy. But making this case, in large part, is the aim of a report published by the U.K.-based public health agency Knowledge-Action-Change (KAC) [...] And it has to be said that the case needs to be made, as becomes clear [...] that it is a “moral imperative” that the World Health Organization and its allies retrench from their current “intransigent and obstructive position of not only refusing to accept any positive health benefits from SNPs but actively campaigning against their use.”

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The Vuse electronic-cigarette product of R.J. Reynolds Vapor Co. continued to chip away at the market share of top-selling Juul in the latest Nielsen analysis of convenience store data.

The report covers the four-week period ending Nov. 20.

Nielsen determined Vuse had a 34.4% market share, edging up from 34.3% in the previous report.

Meanwhile, Juul was at 38.8%, down from 40.6% in the previous report.

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The figures for 2020 are expected to show a small increase in the number of smokers Britain for the first time since the 1970s. Ministers are committed to a ‘smoke-free’ Britain by 2030 which would see fewer than five per cent of the adult population smoking tobacco. Tobacco industry insiders say sales have been up during the pandemic as more people struggled with the anxiety and stress caused by lockdowns.

Earlier this year Health Sec Sajid Javid allowed doctors to prescribe vaping to smokers who want to quit.

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Earlier this month, news outlets all over the world reported breathlessly on new research which claimed to find that e-cigarette users were 15 percent more likely to have a stroke at young age than smokers. [...] The problem is that this “research” was at best, highly misleading and, at worst, plain wrong.

First, this was not new published research as a casual reader might assume, but instead an unpublished conference presentation given a boost by the American Heart Association (AHA) which is explicitly opposed to reeduced risk alternatives to smoking such as vaping.

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The World Health Organization (WHO) has come under fire for advancing and crafting ‘draconian laws’ on tobacco control which are allegedly intended to ‘kill’ tobacco smokers, more so in Low and Middle-Income Countries (LMICs), which largely depend on tobacco production.
Renowned global governance experts and human rights defenders argue that WHO policies on tobacco control are dictatorial and run counter to the promotion of social and economic rights of LMICs while “killing smokers with combustible cigarettes”.

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Dr Kathryn Scott, Chief Executive at Yorkshire Cancer Research, said: “We are delighted to see that vaping products have been included in the NICE tobacco guidelines.

“The Charity’s goal is for 2,000 more people in Yorkshire to survive cancer every year. With more than 4,500 new cases of cancer linked to smoking in the region each year, helping people to stop smoking cigarettes is vital to achieving this goal.

“Easy and reliable access to vaping products will give more people in Yorkshire the best chance of quitting for good.”

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In November, two major treaties had their Conference of the Parties (COP) meetings. [...] Both aim to address a globally significant problem, and both aim to achieve radical transformations in the markets for energy and tobacco, respectively. In tobacco and nicotine, we see a different debate. As with climate change, almost everyone agrees there is a problem. Using WHO figures, smoking causes about 8 million premature deaths annually, and many millions more fall severely ill with various forms of cancer, heart disease and respiratory conditions. But in public health, we are sharply divided into two camps—the transformers versus the abolitionists.

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Philip Morris International Inc. and partner Altria Group Inc. have to stop importing their IQOS heated-tobacco sticks into the U.S. after a deadline passed without any action by the Biden administration to stop it.

Philip Morris and Reynolds America Inc. had each been talking with administration officials since September, when the International Trade Commission ordered the import ban in September after finding that IQOS infringed two Reynolds patents for electrically-powered devices with a heater to generate an aerosol. The order entered a sixty-day presidential review period.

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Philip Morris (PM.N) will reach its target of 50% sales from smoke-free products by 2025 through organic revenue growth rather than mergers and acquisitions, its CEO told Reuters.

The maker of Marlboro cigarettes has spent more than $8 billion on reduced risk products since it began developing them a decade ago, Chief Executive Jacek Olczak said in an interview during the Reuters Next conference.

 

About 30% of revenue at Philip Morris now comes from "smoke-free" products such as iQOS tobacco heating devices, Olczak added on Thursday.

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China's tobacco regulator issued on Thursday draft rules governing e-cigarettes, moving the product away from a regulatory grey area and under the oversight of the state.

The State Tobacco Monopoly Administration's draft rules follow China's cabinet last week amending its tobacco monopoly law to include e-cigarettes.

 

According to the draft rules, companies selling e-cigarettes in China must meet national standards in order to register with the tobacco authority and do business legally.

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A decline in New Zealand’s national smoking rate has seen small business representatives call on the Australian Government to implement a similar vaping consumer model.

The New Zealand Government’s annual health update showed the national smoking rate had dropped from 13.7 per cent to 10.9 per cent, following the legalisation of nicotine containing vaping products to be sold in retail stores in 2020. [...] Theo Foukkare, AACS CEO, said the New Zealand model shows that by offering consumers access to nicotine containing e-cigarettes and vaping products more people will come off tobacco.

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New research [...] has suggested a correlation between vaping nicotine and impotence, as findings indicate male e-cigarette users are more than twice as likely to suffer from erectile dysfunction [ED] compared to non-vapers.

The study [...] restricting the scope to men in the US aged 20 to 65 who responded to questions regarding ED for the survey. “Our analyses accounted for the cigarette smoking history of participants, including those who were never cigarette smokers to begin with, so it is possible that daily e-cigarette vaping may be associated with higher odds of erectile dysfunction regardless of one’s smoking history,” [...]

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Ever since the Royal College of Physicians (RCP) recognized the case for tobacco harm reduction (THR) in a 2007 report and Public Health England concluded that e-cigarettes were at least 95 percent less harmful than combustible cigarettes in 2015, the United Kingdom has been a forerunner in including reduced-risk products in its tobacco control strategy. The country’s 2017 Tobacco Control Plan (TCP), published by the department of health, stresses the importance of innovation and less harmful alternatives. Most anti-smoking and public health organizations as well as medical institutions in the U.K. support vape products as a reduced-risk alternative to cigarettes.

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This guideline covers support to stop smoking for everyone aged 12 and over, and help to reduce people's harm from smoking if they are not ready to stop in one go. It also covers ways to prevent children, young people and young adults aged 24 and under from taking up smoking. The guideline brings together and updates all NICE's previous guidelines on using tobacco, including smokeless tobacco. It covers nicotine replacement therapy and e-cigarettes to help people stop smoking or reduce their harm from smoking. It does not cover using tobacco products such as ‘heat not burn’ tobacco.

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We find a strange adherence and affection for the prohibition of products in our country even though such products are allowed to be manufactured and traded legally worldwide. As a consumer, we strongly feel bans can be placed on products and related services only if there is a risk that they may cause serious injury, illness, or death. Globally, countries are engaged in harmonising laws and standards to promote Universal Quality and Safety Standards in the interest of public health. It has been well documented that bans have done little to protect the consumer, rather they encourage accelerated growth of contraband products.

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A virtual summit in the UK next week aims to set the record straight: If you think smoking is bad, you’re right. But if you think attacking alternatives like e-cigarettes will make things better, you’re really wrong.

“The E-Cigarette Summit UK comes at an historical time for global tobacco policy, where restrictive bans and higher taxation on e-cigarettes has become the prevailing direction for tobacco control, with the emphasis on restricting big tobacco from addicting the next generation,” [...]

In this country, some public health policymakers want to treat alternatives to traditional cigarettes — vaping, snus, and heat-not-burn technology – like smoking.