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Former FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb said Monday that Juul Labs’ products should be removed from the market, citing two studies that showed the scope of teen use of its e-cigarettes and flavored pods.

“It’s very clear that Juul can’t keep their products out of the hands of kids,” said Gottlieb, a physician, health advocate and Pfizer board member. He left the Food and Drug Administration in April. “What’s driving the youth use is primarily Juul.”

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There is an inordinate amount of unjustified hysteria about the dangers of electronic cigarettes. And it continues to drive me crazy to read article after article which talks about how a 17-year-old youth almost died and had to be put on a ventilator for several days and then immediately transitions to a discussion of the health dangers of nicotine-containing e-cigarettes, which dominates the remainder of the article. [...]

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US news dominates again this week, with New York’s mayor trying to force through draconian anti-vaping laws in the face of opposition from vapers and the industry. The federal government is also due to announce new legislation this week, although details are sparse right now. It seems almost certain President Trump will make the “Tobacco 21” law national, and apply it to reduced-harm products as well. All this is happening against the backdrop of a major new study that shows e-cigarettes are not persuading teens to try tobacco.

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At any moment the Trump administration is expected to announce new policy intended to “clear the market” of flavored nicotine vaping products, in an effort to stem the so-called “epidemic” in youth vaping.

Many observers say the Trump ban could have a devastating impact on adult access and choice of flavored vaping products, products which they insist have proven essential in helping millions of smokers to quit.

What are the twenty things you should know about the U.S. flavor ban? Clive Bates, international tobacco control expert is here with the answers.

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The number of male smokers in Korea has halved over the last 20 years, but the obesity rate has significantly risen during the same period, according to a national survey. [...] "The number of smokers has gradually decreased over the past 20 years, but the most significant drop took place in 2015 after the government raised cigarette prices. This means government policy played a role in improving public health," said Kang Jae-heon, a professor at Kangbuk Samsung Hospital who participated in the research.

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Optimally resolving a nationwide outbreak of any illness involves the cooperation of not only countless local, state and federal agencies, but the media, medical providers and private industry as well. Above all, it involves cooperation from the public. Regardless of how an illness is spread or manifested, how quickly an outbreak can be brought to an end often depends on the public complying with public health messaging. This compliance, in turn, requires trust.

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Canadian health officials say they are closely monitoring an apparent U.S. breakthrough into the cause of a mysterious vaping illness.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say they have a “very strong culprit” in a chemical compound known as vitamin E acetate.

The compound was found in fluid taken from the lungs of 29 patients across the United States, as well as liquid from electronic cigarettes and other vaping devices used by many who fell ill.

Health Canada spokesman Eric Morrissette says vitamin E acetate is not allowed in Canadian cannabis vaping products.

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CVS Health President and CEO Larry Merlo said Wednesday that he worries about the rise in teen tobacco use amid the popularity of vaping products such as e-cigarettes.

Public health officials are seeing teen tobacco use "go the wrong way," Merlo said in an interview with CNBC's Jim Cramer on "Mad Money." "We've got to get our arms around that issue and reverse that trend."

Research shows that teens who vape are more likely than their peers to turn to cigarettes.

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In my second year in junior high in Philadelphia, I sat with two dozen peers, waiting for the start of our mandatory seminar on “drug abuse.” It was 1984. President Ronald Reagan had just won his second term, and the War on Drugs was in surge mode.

As we fidgeted at our desks, waiting for our chain-smoking health class teacher to begin his outdated presentation—with stern warnings about Quaaludes and “Reds” (Seconal), two drugs that to this day I’ve never so much as seen, let alone been offered—a far-reaching development was happening outside.

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For the study, male and female mice were exposed for two hours per day for three days to aerosols vaped from e-cigarettes using propylene glycol as the "carrier fluid," common among these products. Exposure for just three days was enough to incur sufficient damage to their lungs, setting the stage for long-term chronic lung damage. This damage occurred both with e-cigarettes containing nicotine, and those with just the propylene glycol carrier fluid.

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For thousands of years, people have been enjoying the subtle rush that smoking tobacco leaves, thereby ingesting nicotine, can provide.

But it wasn’t until about 220 years ago that doctors started realizing how harmful smoking can be. Dr. Benjamin Rush was one of the first to point this out, in 1798, calling smoking “offensive” and a-moral, while also suggesting, correctly, that it can prompt “incurable diseases” and cancers.

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Vaping can still cause heart disease despite being touted as a healthy alternative to smoking, warns a new study.

On top of nicotine, research shows vapes contain particulate matter, metals and flavorings - all of which contribute to cardiovascular problems. Simply put: vaping is 'just not worth the risk,' said lead author of the new Ohio State University study, Nicholas Buchanan. He and his team reviewed the research that's been done on the cardiovascular effects of e-cigarettes so far and, though they say many more and larger studies are desperately needed, [...]

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More than half of young people who vape prefer the highest concentration of nicotine in their e-juice, a Smoke-Free Nova Scotia survey has found.
Among 16- to 18-year-olds who vape nicotine-based juice, 66.5 per cent use pods with nicotine concentrations of at least 50 milligrams per millilitre. On average that would be equal to the nicotine content of one cigarette pack. (Most respondents vaped about three pods a week).
“That’s very concerning because those are the highest concentrations of nicotine available on the market,” said Mohammed Al-Hamdani, [...]

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Juul stopped selling fruity and sweet-flavored pods in brick and mortar stores in November 2018, but the pods were still available online to buyers 21 and over. Juul, which commands about three-quarters of the U.S. e-cigarette market, last month voluntarily stopped selling fruity and dessert-flavored vape pods (mango, creme, fruit and cucumber) online, admitting there was a “lack of trust” in the e-cigarette industry and signaling its intent to keep such products out of underage hands.

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Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are still a very new thing as far as research is concerned. In other words, scientists don’t actually know much about what e-cigarettes do to the body. However, a new review on e-cigarettes and heart health, published in the journal Cardiovascular Health on November 7, 2019, says that these devices have a worrying impact on the cardiovascular system, despite the widespread perception that they are safe.

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This is pointed out by the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) following the frequent occurrences of severe lung disorders amongst "vapers" in the USA. "According to current understanding, e-cigarette consumers in Germany do not face any increased risks, provided they continue to use products that comply with European and German regulations," says BfR President Professor Dr. Dr. Andreas Hensel."

However, 'vapers' should pay attention to symptoms such as breathing difficulties or chest pain, especially after product change."

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Juul Labs, the nation’s largest seller of e-cigarettes, said on Thursday that it would stop selling mint-flavored pods, which have become especially popular among teenagers.

The move precedes an anticipated federal flavor ban that is to be announced soon, one that the Food and Drug Administration initially had said would include mint as well as menthol. In recent weeks, intense lobbying by the vaping and tobacco industries against a menthol ban has heightened speculation that menthol would be exempt from any prohibitions against flavors.

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San Francisco’s upcoming ban on the sale of e-cigarettes will move forward after voters overwhelmingly rejected a ballot measure Tuesday that aimed to overturn the prohibition.

Roughly 80% of voters cast ballots against Proposition C, which had sought to repeal a law passed by the Board of Supervisors in June that suspended the sale of electronic cigarettes in the city until the products are reviewed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Just over 19% of ballots cast were in favor of the measure.

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A CABINET MINISTER and a Fine Gael colleague were among those who contacted Health Minister Simon Harris in relation to the use of e-cigarettes in Ireland, department correspondence has revealed.

Last month Harris told the Oireachtas Health Committee that he believed it was “appalling the amount of members of the Oireachtas that are bringing around vaping companies in here and asking me to meet them”.

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Some legalization proponents believe it’s important to stop using the term “marijuana” and instead refer to the substance only by its scientific name, “cannabis.” In order to appeal to more people, they argue, it’s better to stick with a term that isn’t controversial and doesn’t come with ugly historic baggage. A new study, however, suggests that reframing the drug as such doesn’t make much difference to the average person.

“Throughout each of our tests, we find no evidence to suggest that the public distinguishes between the terms ‘marijuana’ and ‘cannabis,'” the study’s authors wrote [...]